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Dutch Improving Cycle Networks, Building Fast Cycle Lanes

The Dutch are already well-known for having the best bicycle facilities in the world (well, there is a bit of competition between the Netherlands and Denmark, but the two nations are clearly on top of the world when it comes to this matter). Now, the Dutch are actually planning to improve their cycle networks with some faster, high-quality, high-capacity cycle routes. Here’s more from BikeRadar (full repost):

In a bid to persuade citizens to switch to pedal power for their regular commute, the Dutch are to build a series of high quality, high-capacity cycle routes between towns and cities where traffic jams are a regular headache.

The concept is known as Fiets Filevrij – or ‘queue-free cycling’ – and at the end of 2010 the Dutch Ministry for Infrastructure and the Environment pledged €21 million for cycle lane building programmes along 16 routes linking places suffering from chronic congestion.

This is just the latest instalment in the long-running programme – it began back in 2006 with the selection of five ‘rapid cycling’ routes. The final investment total, supplemented by local councils, is expected to be around €80m.

The aim is to lure drivers out of their cars by reducing delays along the cycle routes – including things like waiting times at lights – and by improving the quality of the cycling itself through such measures as smooth tarmac, good lighting and the construction of new bridges and tunnels.

Five of the 16 routes are already complete, including Arnhem to Nijmegen and The Hague to Leiden. The majority of the routes are in the densely populated central area of the country and will facilitate journeys of up to 15km between major population centres. That’s the distance the authorities believe people will readily cycle if suitably fast, high quality routes are provided.

Of course, the Netherlands isn’t short of cycle routes – there are two national systems, one of recreational routes (LF routes), signed in green and white, and one of ‘door to door’ utility routes, signed in red and white.

Related Stories:
1. #1 Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Great Bicycle City Photo Tour
2. #6 Groningen, Netherlands: Great Bicycle City Photo Tour
3. Fighting Bike Theft with GPS in Holland

Photo Credit: Zachary Shahan (me)

Written by Zach

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009.

Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity.

To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

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